Internal Medicine

Diagnosing and treating your pet's medical problems.

Though the physical examination, radiology, ultrasound, bloodwork and urinalysis, the doctors at Independence can diagnose and treat your pet’s medical problems. Our modern, hospital provides for a clean, comfortable stay if your pet needs to be hospitalized. Our compassionate staff and doctors provide unparalleled care, while our automated fluid pumps provide medications and fluids round the clock to your pet. While prevention and wellness care is our main focus with patients, pets do get sick. Our veterinarians and staff have the skill and experience in diagnosis and treatment of canine and feline diseases needed to help your pet heal.

Our veterinarians and staff are dedicated to the highest standard of medical care, provided with a personal touch. Patient wellbeing is our top priority. For patients requiring specialized care, we have access to board-certified specialists in small animal internal medicine through our referral program as well as the convenience of specialists that will come to Independence to examine your pet. We will not stop until we find an answer.

Diagnostic Testing for Pets

 

A variety of diagnostic tests can be performed in our laboratory, but there are a few tests that are standard in wellness care and in the early diagnosis of developing health problems.

 

Blood tests—Blood work is the most common type of diagnostic testing. A small amount of blood from your pet can provide invaluable information about its overall health.

 

CBC—The complete blood cell count (CBC) tells us about the number and condition of your pet’s red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells carry oxygen to all of the tissues of the body; too many white blood cells can indicate infection; and too few platelets may indicate problems with blood clotting.

 

Blood chemistry panel—A blood chemistry panel provides a general picture of overall health in your pet, providing information about the internal organs and metabolic health. A chemistry panel typically includes these tests: screening for liver disease, kidney disease, and diabetes mellitus; assessing electrolyte levels such as sodium, potassium, and chloride; and evaluation of thyroid function.

 

Urine analysis—A urine analysis reveals quite a bit about your pet’s kidney function, such as evidence of urinary crystals, urinary tract infection, or diabetes. There are several ways to collect a urine sample from your companion animals. One is to simply catch a sample in a clean container. Depending on the health concerns involved, your veterinarian may prefer to collect a urine sample using a sterile catheter or by performing a cystocentesis, where a sterile needle is passed through the skin and into the bladder. These methods yield a very clean sample and are well tolerated by dogs and cats.


Diagnostic Testing for Pets

A variety of diagnostic tests can be performed in our laboratory, but there are a few tests that are standard in wellness care and in the early diagnosis of developing health problems.

Blood tests—Blood work is the most common type of diagnostic testing. A small amount of blood from your pet can provide invaluable information about its overall health.

CBC—The complete blood cell count (CBC) tells us about the number and condition of your pet’s red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells carry oxygen to all of the tissues of the body; too many white blood cells can indicate infection; and too few platelets may indicate problems with blood clotting.

Blood chemistry panel—A blood chemistry panel provides a general picture of overall health in your pet, providing information about the internal organs and metabolic health. A chemistry panel typically includes these tests: screening for liver disease, kidney disease, and diabetes mellitus; assessing electrolyte levels such as sodium, potassium, and chloride; and evaluation of thyroid function.

Urine analysis—A urine analysis reveals quite a bit about your pet’s kidney function, such as evidence of urinary crystals, urinary tract infection, or diabetes. There are several ways to collect a urine sample from your companion animals. One is to simply catch a sample in a clean container. Depending on the health concerns involved, your veterinarian may prefer to collect a urine sample using a sterile catheter or by performing a cystocentesis, where a sterile needle is passed through the skin and into the bladder. These methods yield a very clean sample and are well tolerated by dogs and cats.

Often, we perform several tests together for a complete picture of your pet’s overall health.

Call us at (940) 668-8282 today to find out more.

Internal Medicine